Smithsonian Institution Website

Digitization Program Office

A Showcase for Digitization Projects at the Smithsonian

Venezuelan Botany Specimen is Half-Millionth Item Digitized!

Tue, 11/10/2015 - 10:30 -- BeauchampJW
Author: 
Jessica Beauchamp, DPO
Image: 
Mass digitization at National Museum of Natural History

The Smithsonian’s Digitization Program Office team, working alongside staff from 9 museums across the Smithsonian, has reached a monumental digitization milestone!  On Friday, November 6th, a Venezuelan Botany specimen sheet from the National Museum of Natural History's Department of Botany made its way down the conveyor belt, making it the 1/2-millionth item that a DPO-managed project has digitized since our Mass Digitization program began in earnest in late 2013.  

Bell X-1 in 3D

Thu, 06/18/2015 - 12:52 -- sysadmin
Author: 
The National Air and Space Museum
Image: 
Bell X-1 in 3D

In April, the Smithsonian X 3D team pointed their lasers and scanners at the Bell X-1, the same iconic aircraft that shot Capt. Charles ‘Chuck’ Yeager across the pristine skies of the Mojave Desert to a record-breaking speed. On October 14, 1947, in the Bell X-1, Yeager became the first pilot to fly faster than sound. Now, we can all get as close to the Bell X-1 as Yeager himself with the recently released 3D tour of the exterior of the aircraft.

Coming Soon: Discovery 3D!

Wed, 04/01/2015 - 13:15 -- BeauchampJW
Author: 
Dr. Valerie Neal, Chair of the Space History Department, National Air & Space Museum
Image: 
Space Shuttle Discovery

Every week or two we see news of another museum digitizing its collection and making it accessible online. The Smithsonian is no exception, and efforts are under way across our campus to scan artifacts, works of art, documents, and films and put them on our websites. These projects take months if not years to complete, but it is our high priority to open the museums to visitors beyond our walls, and digitization is a key part of our strategy.

3D Scanning: The 21st-Century Equivalent to a 19th Century Process

Fri, 03/27/2015 - 13:52 -- BeauchampJW
Author: 
Karen Lemmey, Sculpture Curator, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Image: 
Jon Blundell of the Smithsonian Digitization Program Office 3D Scanning the Greek Slave

Karen Lemmey, American Art's sculpture curator is organizing an installation that will include Hiram Power's Greek Slave, one of the most popular sculptures of the 19th century. As part of her preparation, she is working with Smithsonian X 3D, part of the Institution's Digitization program, to create a 3D model of the Greek Slave. Karen fills us in on the process. 

Smithsonian X 3D: How a 167-year-old Museum Leverages 3D Technology

Tue, 01/27/2015 - 12:06 -- BeauchampJW
Author: 
Günter Waibel, Director, Digitization Program Office, OCIO
Image: 
T. Rex 3D Skull

Smithsonian X 3D brings museum collections to homes and classrooms by applying cutting-edge 3D technology to one-of-a-kind objects such as the 1903 Wright Flyer, Lincoln’s Life Masks, a 1500 year old Buddha sculpture, a prehistoric fossilized whale, or a Super Nova. The 3D models are presented online at 3D.SI.EDU through a plug-in free explorer based on WebGL, which was created for the Smithsonian by the 3D design firm Autodesk.

3D Explorer: Learn to Use the Cross Section, Measuring, and Sharing Tools

Mon, 12/22/2014 - 15:53 -- BeauchampJW
Author: 
Vince Rossi, DPO 3D Imaging
Image: 
1904 Wright Flyer

This video tutorial will show you how to use the cross section, measuring and sharing tools with the Smithsonian 3D Explorer. Try these tools out for yourself with the 1904 Wright Flyer model by clicking this link- http://3d.si.edu/explorer?modelid=48

Smithsonian Creates the First-ever 3D Presidential Portrait

Tue, 12/02/2014 - 13:00 -- BeauchampJW
Author: 
Günter Waibel, Director, Digitization Program Office, OCIO
Image: 
3D portrait of President Barack Obama

The first presidential portraits created from 3-D scan data are now on display in the Smithsonian Castle. The portraits of President Barack Obama were created based on data collected by a Smithsonian-led team of 3-D digital imaging specialists and include a digital and 3-D printed bust and life mask. A new video released today by the White House (and shown below) details the behind-the-scenes process of scanning, creating and printing the historic portraits.

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