Smithsonian Institution Website

Digitization Program Office

A Showcase for Digitization Projects at the Smithsonian

We’re 3D Scanning The Nation’s T. rex!

Thu, 05/08/2014 - 14:23 -- BeauchampJW
Author: 
Jon Blundell, DPO 3D Imaging
3D Scanning T Rex Diagram

On April 15, 2014 sixteen wooden crates containing the Nation’s T. rex arrived at the National Museum of Natural History from Montana. While the curators are carefully unpacking the crates, and performing a condition evaluation, the Smithsonian X 3D scanning team is making digital models of the bones. We are using handheld 3D scanners to capture high-resolution surface and color information from each bone. We’re scanning the entire T. rex, so it will take time—there are more than 200 bones and the T. rex requires careful handling.

There are three basic steps to creating 3D models from the T. rex fossils. 1) While the data is captured by the 3D scanner, it shows up on the computer screen in near real time - this helps us track the progress and ensure thorough coverage of the scan. 2) Next, software is used to align the scans, clean up the color and geometry information and 3) finally, a 3D model is created—an accurate replica of the object.

What can you do with a 3D model? Models can be used for 3D printing in schools and provide new ways for the public to experience the Smithsonian through our online 3D Explorer (found at http://3d.si.edu/).  3D data also gives researchers new ways to analyze collection objects. The paleontologists will use 3D models of the bones to help put the T. rex back together. The new dinosaur exhibit will open in 2019, and in the meantime, visit us at www.3D.si.edu.

Functional Area: 

Comments

Submitted by Joe (not verified) on
Will the T. rex 3d model become available on the 3D.si.edu X 3D site? That is something that I have been looking forward to since I first read this over a year ago.

Submitted by BeauchampJW on
Yes--eventually the 3D dataset for T. rex will be made available when the scan is complete. Scanning the last two and largest sections of the specimen requires special rigging to complete, and this is just one of many big projects our small team is working on. Follow us @3D_Digi_SI and Like us at https://www.facebook.com/3d.si.edu to keep up with our latest news.

Add new comment

All comments are moderated, and will not appear until they have been approved.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.